FAQ

You and your child will benefit most from the psychoeducational evaluation process if you are fully informed and trust the professionals involved.

Below are examples of frequently asked questions and answers.

 


The evaluation procedures used by either the school psychologist at your child’s school or by
one in a private practice are essentially the same. We are required to inform you that a wide
range of assessment services are available to your child free of charge through the public
school system. However, you benefit from our experience and flexibility when scheduling
appointments. We are committed to evaluating your child’s unique strengths, weaknesses, and
learning styles, while maintaining the highest level of integrity and empathy. Our office is a
family friendly environment, and allows for adequate time and opportunity to meet with you
given your scheduling needs. We are often able to meet with your child more quickly, and can
ascertain his or her abilities with fewer time restrictions, as we offer weekend appointments.
A comprehensive psychoeducational evaluation is a useful tool in understanding your child’s
ability level, academic strengths and weaknesses, and learning styles. The information
gathered through the evaluation process will help you and your child’s teacher(s) understand
how to help him or her achieve success at home or at school. Academic remediation and
interventions can then be tailored specifically to your child’s unique abilities.
 ccc
Important note: It is to your child’s advantage that you share any information about prior
testing with the school psychologist who is completing the evaluation. Most tests cannot be
administered within a full year of the last test administration. If a test is unknowingly
administered sooner than one full year, results are deemed “invalid”. Additional expense is
then incurred, as it will be necessary to administer additional tests to your child.

School psychologists have received specialized training in both psychology and education. Their training and skills allow them to work together with educators, parents, and other mental health professionals to ensure that every child learns in a supportive and safe environment. School psychologists understand that district procedures and effective teaching strategies are necessary for a child’s success, and are trained to help parents and educators. School psychologists are required to complete a graduate program of 60+ semester hours, including a year long internship. Their training emphasizes the following components: child development, mental health, learning, behavior, motivation, and school organization. School psychologists provide the following services: consultation, assessment, intervention, prevention, education, research and planning, and health care provision.

The components of your child’s psychoeducational evaluation depend on your concerns and the needs of your
child. The following is a brief description of what your child’s psychoeducational evaluation may include:
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Intelligence tests
Usually referred to as IQ tests, intelligence tests are norm referenced, standardized, diagnostic tools that
broadly measure traits which predict academic success. The tests most commonly used provide an overall
score or estimate of your child’s ability to learn what is typically taught in school. Intelligence tests can
include a combination of the following: verbal/language based tasks, nonverbal problem solving skills, short
term auditory memory, and processing speed. Subtests involved can be both timed and untimed.
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Achievement tests
These tests measure academic skills acquired through schooling (basic skills needed to master reading,
math, writing, and oral language tasks). Subtests can be both timed and untimed.
 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Cognitive processing tests
These tests measure how your child uses information when learning. Areas may involve: language,
long term memory, short term memory, working memory, visual spatial skills, visual motor integration
skills, auditory processing, and processing speed. Subtests can be both timed and untimed.
 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Behavior rating scales
These usually refer to checklists or rating scales which can be completed by parents, teachers, and the
student. These tools can show how a student’s behavior is perceived in different settings by different
individuals. The rating scales can also indicate how a child perceives his or her own behavior. However,
there are drawbacks to consider. Results from behavior rating scales are only accurate if the adults (parents,
teachers, therapists, etc.) and the student completing them respond honestly to the questions posed. As rating
scales are “subjective”, various individuals can rate the same student very differently.
 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Personality tests/social-emotional functioning
These include rating scales, questionnaires, and projective procedures which measure your child’s
personality traits, behavior at home and school, and emotional adjustment. Questionnaires or interviews
involve asking your child about his or her feelings in specific situations, and about fears and concerns, etc.
Projective procedures indirectly evaluate your child’s personality and feelings via pictures, stories, etc. Your
child’s responses can indicate underlying personality traits, fears, life stressors, anxiety, etc. Keep in mind
that interpretation of these measures is very subjective.
 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Developmental abilities
These instruments measure your child’s development in the areas of adaptive skills,
social emotional functioning, communication, cognitive abilities, and motor skills.
Several different methods are used when obtaining information about your child. The school
psychologist first gathers information about your child regarding developmental milestones,
academic and/or behavioral strengths and weaknesses, and supplemental information found in
your child’s cumulative records. After obtaining this information, the school psychologist will
meet with your child during one or more sessions. The school psychologist will establish a
rapport with your child prior to any evaluations to ensure your child’s level of comfort. During
the evaluation session(s), the school psychologist will administer diagnostic tests, which
provide detailed information about specific areas (intelligence, academic skills, learning
processes). These tests are used to determine how well your child performs, where your child
is having difficulty, and what instruction or support is needed to help your child achieve
success. When all tests have been administered, the school psychologist will compile the results
in a written report, which will then be explained to you.
RtI stands for Response to Intervention (RtI). It is a process that provides intervention and
educational support to all students at increasing levels of intensity based on their own individual
needs. The goal of RtI is to prevent problems and intervene early, so that students can be
successful. The RtI process has three tiers, each providing more intensive levels of support. Tier 1
includes high quality instruction for all students in the general education classroom. Tier 2
includes additional interventions and supplemental instruction to small groups of students who
need more support than they are receiving through Tier 1. Tier 3 includes intensive interventions to
meet the needs of individual students. Students who are receiving support through the RtI process
are closely monitored for progress and to determine if the interventions are meeting their needs.
The length of the evaluation session(s) depends primarily on your child. The amount of sessions
needed to complete your child’s psychoeducational evaluation depend on your child’s age, level of
attention or distractibility, ability level, response style, stamina or fatigue, and the areas we are
assessing. In addition, the amount of time needed to establish a rapport with children varies with each
individual. We begin the evaluation only after establishing a rapport with your child. Throughout the
evaluation session(s), we strive to maintain your child’s level of comfort by providing short breaks
and allowing him or her to work at their own pace.
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
On average, an intellectual assessment (“Gifted” evaluation) takes 1 to 1 ½ hours. A comprehensive
psychoeducational evaluation for learning difficulties takes approximately 4 to 6 hours. A
comprehensive evaluation for attentional or socialemotional difficulties can take up to 7 hours. These
estimates are for the time we spend working one on one with your child. Consultation and interviews
with parents and students, review of background information, test preparation, and report writing all
require additional time

We will schedule a feedback session to discuss the results of your child’s evaluation at our office within three weeks from the date of evaluation. Our goal is to ensure that the information we share with you is clear and helpful. We will address any questions or concerns you may have at that time.

RtI stands for Response to Intervention (RtI). It is a process that provides intervention and
educational support to all students at increasing levels of intensity based on their own individual
needs. The goal of RtI is to prevent problems and intervene early, so that students can be
successful. The RtI process has three tiers, each providing more intensive levels of support. Tier 1
includes high quality instruction for all students in the general education classroom. Tier 2
includes additional interventions and supplemental instruction to small groups of students who
need more support than they are receiving through Tier 1. Tier 3 includes intensive interventions to
meet the needs of individual students. Students who are receiving support through the RtI process
are closely monitored for progress and to determine if the interventions are meeting their needs.

We will schedule a feedback session to discuss the results of your child’s evaluation at our office within three weeks from the date of evaluation. Our goal is to ensure that the information we share with you is clear and helpful. We will address any questions or concerns you may have at that time.

The evaluation procedures used by either the school psychologist at your child’s school or by
one in a private practice are essentially the same. We are required to inform you that a wide
range of assessment services are available to your child free of charge through the public
school system. However, you benefit from our experience and flexibility when scheduling
appointments. We are committed to evaluating your child’s unique strengths, weaknesses, and
learning styles, while maintaining the highest level of integrity and empathy. Our office is a
family friendly environment, and allows for adequate time and opportunity to meet with you
given your scheduling needs. We are often able to meet with your child more quickly, and can
ascertain his or her abilities with fewer time restrictions, as we offer weekend appointments.
The length of the evaluation session(s) depends primarily on your child. The amount of sessions
needed to complete your child’s psychoeducational evaluation depend on your child’s age, level of
attention or distractibility, ability level, response style, stamina or fatigue, and the areas we are
assessing. In addition, the amount of time needed to establish a rapport with children varies with each
individual. We begin the evaluation only after establishing a rapport with your child. Throughout the
evaluation session(s), we strive to maintain your child’s level of comfort by providing short breaks
and allowing him or her to work at their own pace.
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
On average, an intellectual assessment (“Gifted” evaluation) takes 1 to 1 ½ hours. A comprehensive
psychoeducational evaluation for learning difficulties takes approximately 4 to 6 hours. A
comprehensive evaluation for attentional or socialemotional difficulties can take up to 7 hours. These
estimates are for the time we spend working one on one with your child. Consultation and interviews
with parents and students, review of background information, test preparation, and report writing all
require additional time
The components of your child’s psychoeducational evaluation depend on your concerns and the needs of your
child. The following is a brief description of what your child’s psychoeducational evaluation may include:
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Intelligence tests
Usually referred to as IQ tests, intelligence tests are norm referenced, standardized, diagnostic tools that
broadly measure traits which predict academic success. The tests most commonly used provide an overall
score or estimate of your child’s ability to learn what is typically taught in school. Intelligence tests can
include a combination of the following: verbal/language based tasks, nonverbal problem solving skills, short
term auditory memory, and processing speed. Subtests involved can be both timed and untimed.
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Achievement tests
These tests measure academic skills acquired through schooling (basic skills needed to master reading,
math, writing, and oral language tasks). Subtests can be both timed and untimed.
 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Cognitive processing tests
These tests measure how your child uses information when learning. Areas may involve: language,
long term memory, short term memory, working memory, visual spatial skills, visual motor integration
skills, auditory processing, and processing speed. Subtests can be both timed and untimed.
 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Behavior rating scales
These usually refer to checklists or rating scales which can be completed by parents, teachers, and the
student. These tools can show how a student’s behavior is perceived in different settings by different
individuals. The rating scales can also indicate how a child perceives his or her own behavior. However,
there are drawbacks to consider. Results from behavior rating scales are only accurate if the adults (parents,
teachers, therapists, etc.) and the student completing them respond honestly to the questions posed. As rating
scales are “subjective”, various individuals can rate the same student very differently.
 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Personality tests/social-emotional functioning
These include rating scales, questionnaires, and projective procedures which measure your child’s
personality traits, behavior at home and school, and emotional adjustment. Questionnaires or interviews
involve asking your child about his or her feelings in specific situations, and about fears and concerns, etc.
Projective procedures indirectly evaluate your child’s personality and feelings via pictures, stories, etc. Your
child’s responses can indicate underlying personality traits, fears, life stressors, anxiety, etc. Keep in mind
that interpretation of these measures is very subjective.
 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Developmental abilities
These instruments measure your child’s development in the areas of adaptive skills,
social emotional functioning, communication, cognitive abilities, and motor skills.
Several different methods are used when obtaining information about your child. The school
psychologist first gathers information about your child regarding developmental milestones,
academic and/or behavioral strengths and weaknesses, and supplemental information found in
your child’s cumulative records. After obtaining this information, the school psychologist will
meet with your child during one or more sessions. The school psychologist will establish a
rapport with your child prior to any evaluations to ensure your child’s level of comfort. During
the evaluation session(s), the school psychologist will administer diagnostic tests, which
provide detailed information about specific areas (intelligence, academic skills, learning
processes). These tests are used to determine how well your child performs, where your child
is having difficulty, and what instruction or support is needed to help your child achieve
success. When all tests have been administered, the school psychologist will compile the results
in a written report, which will then be explained to you.
A comprehensive psychoeducational evaluation is a useful tool in understanding your child’s
ability level, academic strengths and weaknesses, and learning styles. The information
gathered through the evaluation process will help you and your child’s teacher(s) understand
how to help him or her achieve success at home or at school. Academic remediation and
interventions can then be tailored specifically to your child’s unique abilities.
 ccc
Important note: It is to your child’s advantage that you share any information about prior
testing with the school psychologist who is completing the evaluation. Most tests cannot be
administered within a full year of the last test administration. If a test is unknowingly
administered sooner than one full year, results are deemed “invalid”. Additional expense is
then incurred, as it will be necessary to administer additional tests to your child.

School psychologists have received specialized training in both psychology and education. Their training and skills allow them to work together with educators, parents, and other mental health professionals to ensure that every child learns in a supportive and safe environment. School psychologists understand that district procedures and effective teaching strategies are necessary for a child’s success, and are trained to help parents and educators. School psychologists are required to complete a graduate program of 60+ semester hours, including a year long internship. Their training emphasizes the following components: child development, mental health, learning, behavior, motivation, and school organization. School psychologists provide the following services: consultation, assessment, intervention, prevention, education, research and planning, and health care provision.

Contact Us

4745 Sutton Park Court, Suite 802
Jacksonville, FL 32224
Phone: 904.874.6164
Email: info@pecgroup4kids.com

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